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Students At LeBron James’ I Promise School Show Impressive Academic Improvement

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It’s been nearly a year since NBA star LeBron James opened the I Promise School in his hometown of Akron, Ohio and it has proven to be nothing short of impactful in the lives of underserved children. According to CBS Sports, its students are making strides and displaying excellence when it comes to academics.

James is happy to witness the progress the students have made and hopes that it brings attention to the need for quality education in underserved communities.

“These kids are doing an unbelievable job—better than we all expected. When we first started, people knew I was opening a school for kids. Now people are going to really understand the lack of education they had before they came to our school. People are going to finally understand what goes on behind our doors.”

The I Promise School has grown to become a staple in the community. Aside from enriching the lives of children through education, it provides resources for low-income families; including everything from a food pantry to career support. The school will launch summer camps surrounding STEM education within the next few months and in 2021 students will have the opportunity to further their education at the University of Akron free of tuition.

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CULTURE

Nipsey Hussle & Steph Curry on Fatherhood, Integrity & More

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It was announced Wednesday that Curry has been nominated for a Webby Award in the Best Web Personality/Host category for work on his YouTube series 5 Minutes from Home.

The web series features a different guest every episode, where they take on subjects of substance, such as gender inequity in sports with guest Riley Morrison, the portrayal of women in entertainment (especially rap and hip-hop) with the late Nipsey Hussle, and city politics with the mayor of Oakland, Calif.

Take a look back at episode 2 when Curry had Nipsey Hussle on the show, in which he took a ride with the multi-talented rapper and entrepreneur. The two go deep on a wide range of issues related to sports, music, and fatherhood.

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CULTURE

Nipsey Hussle’s Legacy Transcends Mortality

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“Show me a hero, and I’ll write you a tragedy” —F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1945

The city of Los Angeles, along with fans worldwide, collectively woke up with the heaviest of hearts on April 1, following the tragic murder of Nipsey Hussle. I was only four years old when Tupac Shakur was killed, but this is how I imagine my city felt in ‘96. Massive murals have been painted. Countless tributes and stories from L.A. natives—from all walks of life—have poured in. With the volume up and the windows down, cars are pulling up next to me in traffic, blasting the music of the man called Neighborhood Nip.

Michel Moore, the Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, said in a press conference following his death that “[he] saw the name Nipsey Hussle, and [he] looked at that again, and [he] looked at it again, and it was like [he] could not believe it.” Steve Soboroff, President of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners, revealed Nipsey and Roc Nation had a meeting scheduled for that Monday morning to discuss ways to combat gang violence in South Central Los Angeles.

Despite how hard I’ve tried, I can’t shake the sickening feeling that every detail of Nipsey’s murder played out like a fucking movie script:

  • Nipsey rushing to his The Marathon Clothing store without informing his team or bodyguard because he wanted to hook up a friend who had just been released from a 20-year prison term “with some new gear so he could look good before meeting up with his own family and friends later in the day.” 
  • His final tweet—inspired by an impromptu sit-down with a high-ranking member from a rival gang—sent just a half-hour before he was shot six times by a member of his own: “Having strong enemies is a blessing.”
  • Nipsey’s older brother, Samiel “Blacc Sam” Asghedom, running red lights down Slauson Avenue, arriving just in time to administer CPR before the paramedics arrived.

“You’re dealing with the pressures of trying to be successful as well as the pressure of people intentionally waking up to try to bring harm your way. […] A person that know me and come from the same environment and had the same cards dealt to them that keep going to jail, don’t have no money, never made they parents proud or they momma proud, never did anything that they could look in the mirror and be proud of, it make them feel a certain way, and it’s intense. And that shit manifest into jealousy, hate, violence.” —Nipsey Hussle, 730.no Interview

Nipsey Hussle, born Ermias Asghedom, had an undying love for his city, and he paid for that love with his life. It’s painfully surreal to witness a seemingly inextinguishable light eclipsed by a dark, shapeless void because he deserved better—as a man, a father, a son, a brother, a partner, and a hometown hero. Yet, over the past seven days, I’ve found solace in the one constant throughout his 33 years on this Earth: Nipsey operated without fear.

“Nip is sporadic. Nip gonna pull up and hop up out of the Jordan Downs projects, Nickerson Gardens, in any ‘hood in L.A., Compton, Watts—solo with $150,000 of jewelry on his neck and [an] $80,000 Rolex with no security. That’s why the people loved him,” Blacc Sam told the Los Angeles Times

This was the same Nipsey Hussle, who, despite being the face of one of the biggest and most dangerous gangs in Los Angeles, invested millions into the same block where he survived countless fights, raids, arrests, and shootouts; the same Nipsey Hussle who chose to walk amongst his people on ground zero as a physical manifestation of hope and change.

As Nipsey’s early South Central snarl evolved into the poise of a veteran and community leader, his fortitude remained steadfast. You heard the conviction in his raspy voice, and you saw the fearlessness behind his bloodshot, steely gaze; Nipsey Hussle carried himself with an empowering sense of agency.

When Nipsey spoke (or rapped) he projected ethereal energy into the world; like his spirit was immortal and death was never a possibility—and that’s the silver lining. Even in the wake of his tragic murder, Nipsey’s mission was bigger than himself. The rose that grew from concrete planted its seeds and when your legacy has been cemented, mortality is irrelevant. 

“We look at life like it’s about what you can get from life. You gon’ always be unfulfilled if you look at life like that. It’s about knowing you gon’ leave one day. And, you know, when you leave, the only way you gon’ be fulfilled is if you know you gave everything you had, and you emptied yourself here. And you left it all here, ‘cause it’s temporary and you got a moment.” —Nipsey Hussle, HOT 97 Interview 

Nipsey Hussle was running his own marathon, at his own pace, never forgetting to circleback to the streets that made him. He moved with graceful militance, his resolve never wavered, and he never shied away from sharing his ever-expansive breadth of knowledge and wisdom with the rest of the world. Now, it’s up to us. As the man himself once said, “the highest human act is to inspire.”

The marathon continues.

This article is republished from DJ Booth under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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CULTURE

Nipsey Hussle Square: Councilman Moves To Name Intersection After Slain Rapper

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The outpouring of love for Nipsey Hussle is also coming from the Los Angeles City Council where a lawmaker wants an intersection named in honor of the slain rapper.

Councilman Marqueece Harris-Dawson, a friend of Hussle’s, is expected to introduce legislation on Friday to rename the intersection of Slauson Avenue and Crenshaw Boulevard as “Ermias `Nipsey Hussle’ Asghedom Square,” Fox5 reported.

Fans worldwide continue to mourn 33-year-old Hussle, who died outside his Los Angeles clothing store March 31 from gunshot wounds. Many hold Hussle in high esteem for his activism and community service.

Harris-Dawson has said he first met the rapper in 2013 at a rally against gun violence.

“It was 8 in the morning at Crenshaw High School. And here was this guy who I knew had a show the night before. He was there with his daughter,” the lawmaker told the New York Times, praising Hussle for his tireless work ethic.

Meanwhile, tickets quickly sold out on Tuesday morning for a public memorial honoring Hussle. Fans started snapping up the complimentary seats as soon as they became available online. The memorial is set for Thursday morning at Los Angeles’ Staples Center, which has a seating capacity of 21,000.

Eric Holder, 29, the man accused of killing Hussle, was arrested last week and charged with one count of murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of possession of a firearm by a felon, according to a press release from the Los Angeles County’s District Attorney’s Office. Holder entered a plea of not guilty in court.

There have been unconfirmed reports that Hussle was killed because he was trying to stop gang violence in Los Angeles. However, CNN.com reported the shooting was a personal dispute and while Los Angeles police Chief Michel Moore“declined to elaborate on the feud between the two, saying he didn’t want to jeopardize any potential prosecution, but he said the suspect approached Nipsey and others multiple times, engaging them in conversation.” Moore also said the dispute does not appear gang-related.

While Hussle was associated with gangs, he appeared to be distancing himself from that life. Shortly before his death, he was talking with Steve Soboroff, president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, about how to prevent youth from getting involved in gangs.

The City Council is expected to adjourn its regular Friday meeting in honor of Hussle. At that same meeting, Harris-Dawson is also expected to introduce the motion to rename the intersection.

This article is republished from Newsone under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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